Saturday, November 11, 2006

Depression Self-Test

Just out of curiosity, I took this online test for depression. This is a fairly serious test, though certainly not to be considered a diagnosis. My scores are in line with where I thought they'd be considering recent events in my life, so that's cool.

DisorderYour Score
Major Depression:Slight
Dysthymia:Slight-Moderate
Bipolar Disorder:Slight
Cyclothymia:Slight-Moderate
Seasonal Affective Disorder:Slight
Postpartum Depression:N/A
Take the Depression Test

This is the one the seems most likely, along with seasonal affective disorder (which is not an issue in Tucson):

Dysthymia

Dysthymia, or dysthymic disorder, is a clinical diagnosis of moderate, persistent depression. Sufferers do not routinely experience the extremes of major depression, but the duration can be much longer. Dysthymia does not often inhibit normal activities.

The depression experienced in dysthymia sufferers tends appear almost as a personality trait. They tend to be self-critical and negative, with low self-esteem. Many dysthymics are unable to recall the last time they felt happy. According to UCSF an estimated 6% of the population will experience dysthymic disorder in their lifetimes.

Symptoms of Dysthymia

  • Long-term depression, sadness, anxiety
  • Fatigue, difficulty falling asleep or waking and not being able to fall back asleep
  • Problems with memory or concentration
  • Low self-esteem, guilt, or negative thinking; self-critical
  • Depression seems part of one's personality, gloomy, no joy
  • Unable to remember last time one was happy, confident, or inspired
  • Unexpected weight loss or gain, eating problems
  • Symptoms present for over two years

Differences by Gender

Dysthymia in Women

Women are diagnosed with dysthymic disorder at two to three times the rate as men. This increased incidence may be a result of hormonal fluctuation from the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and menopause. Experts have also suggested that stresses unique to women may be the cause. These stresses include work/home responsibilities, lower wages, single-motherhood, and caring for aging parents. Women in stable marriages have the lowest rates of depression.

Dysthymia in Men

Depressive symptoms often manifest themselves as irritability, anger, and low motivation in men. Men are better able than women to hide their symptoms and are less likely to seek diagnosis and treatment.

Dysthymia by Age Group

Dysthymic disorder is increasingly recognized in children and teens. Girls and boys experience depressive symptoms at equal rates prior to adolescence, at which point the rate increases for girls. Note that for children and teenagers, dysthymic symptoms must be present for one year rather than two.

Dysthymia in the elderly is common, especially after the loss of one's husband or wife or the onset of health problems. The same treatments prescribed for younger people are often effective, however.


Post a Comment