Thursday, June 19, 2014

Jeremy O'Brien: "Quantum Technologies"

Jeremy O'Brien spoke recently at Google on Quantum Technologies, a topic he has written on extensively [see his 2009 paper, with Furusawa and Vu ckovi c, Photonic Quantum Technologies]. This is interesting stuff - and likely to be the future of computing technology.

Jeremy O'Brien: "Quantum Technologies"

June 17, 2014

Jeremy O'Brien visited Google LA to deliver a talk: "Quantum Technologies." This talk took place on April 1, 2014.


The impact of quantum technology will be profound and far-reaching: secure communication networks for consumers, corporations and government; precision sensors for biomedical technology and environmental monitoring; quantum simulators for the design of new materials, pharmaceuticals and clean energy devices; and ultra-powerful quantum computers for addressing otherwise impossibly large datasets for machine learning-artificial intelligence applications. However, engineering quantum systems and controlling them is an immense technological challenge: they are inherently fragile; and information extracted from a quantum system necessarily disturbs the system itself. Despite these challenges a small number of quantum technologies are now commercially available. Delivering the full promise of these technologies will require a concerted quantum engineering effort jointly between academia and industry. We will describe our progress in the Centre for Quantum Photonics to delivering this promise using an integrated quantum photonics platform---generating, manipulating and interacting single particles of light (photons) in waveguide circuits on silicon chips.


Jeremy O'Brien is professor of physics and electrical engineering and director of the Centre for Quantum Photonics (CQP). He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of New South Wales in 2002 for experimental work on correlated and confined electrons in organic conductors, superconductors and semiconductor nanostructures, as well as progress towards the fabrication of a phosphorus in silicon quantum computer. As a research fellow at the University of Queensland (2001-2006) he worked on quantum optics and quantum information science with single photons. CQP's efforts are focused on the fundamental and applied quantum mechanics at the heart of quantum information science and technology, ranging from prototypes for scalable quantum computing to generalised quantum measurements, quantum control, and quantum metrology.
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