Friday, June 29, 2012

Why We are Always Learning to Move: The Science and Engineering of Adaptive Brains


This is some geeky neuroscience stuff, but it is geared toward the general public, so I hope it feels accessible and not too esoteric - it's really interesting stuff, especially for people interested in embodiment. The perspective here, which is implicit in this video, is a good example of human beings as complex adaptive systems.




Why We are Always Learning to Move: The Science and Engineering of Adaptive Brains
The ability to flexibly and adaptively integrate information from a variety of sources is a fundamental feature of brain function, from higher cognition to sensory and motor processing. Philip N. Sabes, UCSF Associate Professor of Physiology, explores what the underlying neural mechanisms are for movement.

Series: "UCSF Osher Mini Medical School for the Public" [6/2012]
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