Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Donna Orange - Beyond Instinct & Intellect: Modern Psychoanalysis

I posted this video a while back, but I just watched it again - Donna Orange has been one of the theorists most closely aligned with Robert Stolorow and his intersubjective systems theory of psychoanalysis (see Working Intersubjectively: Contextualism in Psychoanalytic Practice, with Stolorow and George Atwood).

A major aspect of the new model of psychoanalysis that Orange and Stolorow (and others) work with is the intersubjective relational elements of development and adult relationships, especially as it manifests in the therapeutic alliance. In this perspective, the therapist is no longer a blank slate onto whom the client projects transferences and "hidden drives," but rather, an integral part of the therapeutic dyad, a participant with the client in healing developmental wounds.




Beyond Instinct & Intellect: Modern Psychoanalysis from The New School on FORA.tv


Beyond Instinct & Intellect: Modern Psychoanalysis
George Hagman, author of Aesthetic Experience: Beauty, Creativity, Donna Orange, author of Emotional Understanding, and Thinking for Clinicians, debate the future of psychoanalysis.

They ask whether or not a cross-disciplinary approach is possible in approaching psychotherapy.

George Hagman

George Hagman is the author of Aesthetic Experience: Beauty, Creativity and the Search for the Ideal, and is faculty at National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis. He has published numerous articles. He is the director of Clinical Outpatient Services, Southwest Connecticut Mental Health System.

Dr. Donna Orange

Donna Ornage is Faculty, Training, and Supervising Analyst at Institute for the Specialization of Relational Psychoanalytic Psychology in Rome, as well as faculty and supervising analyst at The Institute for the Study of Subjectivity in New York. She has co-authored two works, Worlds of Experience (2002), and Working Intersubjectively, as well as authored on her own, Emotional Understanding, and Thinking for Clinicians.
Post a Comment