Sunday, August 08, 2010

[UPDATED] Plagiarism: Marc Gafni Plagiarized Alan Barstow and Diane Hamilton Took the Fall

I am reposting this, and I will add back the original comments, at the request of Rocky Anderson, and on behalf of Alan Barstow.

[CLARIFICATION: Rocky Anderson, Chairman of High Road, was deeply bothered that I (or anyone) questioned Alan Barstow's honesty and ethics - at the same time, give or take, that he left that comment, Diane Hamilton took full responsibility for the oversight and offered her sincerest apology.


I just spoke with Rocky - he gave the article to Marc to use as statement of the problem for the piece Marc and Diane were writing, it was not given to Diane - and I have no grasp of why she took the fall. He/they used it verbatim with no credit given to Barstow.

I had removed the post - but Rocky asked me to put it back up on behalf of him and Alan - so that the truth is out there.]

Two different people have alerted me to this apparent instance of plagiarism - and not just a minor forgetting to quote, but essentially taking an entire article as one's own. Parts of an article by Gafni & Hamilton are essentially identical to an article by Alan Barstow - someone is guilty.

I don't know the background on this, although I believe Gafni was on the board at High Road (he resigned), where Barstow posted his article - which makes the apparent outright theft of material even more questionable.

Gafni presents the material as written by him and Diane Hamilton. Gafni also cites a lot of sources, but not the Barstow piece, which is taken almost word for word. I could accept Diane's plea of guilt if it had been a few lines, but not a whole post.

According to Rocky, these two questions at the very end are from ab email with Marc about the article:
Of whom are we demanding each item?
Also, there needs to be specificity for each "demand". When, how much, who, where?
So we are in a he said/she said double bind - no one wins, and the guilty person walks away, again.

Here is the original post from High Road for Human Rights:
Slavery Today: How We Can Stop the Tragedy
by Alan Barstow

What Is Human Trafficking?
Who are the Victims of Human Trafficking?Effects on the Victims and Countries
The State Department's Trafficking in Persons Report, 2008
US Legislation
SOLUTIONS


There are more slaves in the world today than at any other time in history. While precise numbers are hard to ascertain, the International Labor Organization estimates that at least 12.3 million people worldwide—the population of the state of Pennsylvania—are victims of human trafficking.[1] These modern day slaves are exploited in many ways, including the commercial sex industry, as forced laborers and servants, or as child soldiers and child sex workers.[2] Estimates suggest that annual profits from human trafficking range between $9 billion and $32 billion.[3]

[I cut out a chart here that won't reproduce]

Consent of the Victim Is Irrelevant. The emphasis in determining cases of human trafficking is placed on exploitation rather than movement, meaning that a "trafficked" person does not have to be transported at all—he or she need only be exploited for another's gain. [5] This exploitation can take a variety of forms, including forced labor, bonded labor (labor that stems from the exploitation of debt), debt bondage and involuntary servitude among migrant workers, involuntary domestic servitude, forced child labor, child soldiers, sex trafficking and prostitution, children exploited for commercial sex, and child sex tourism.[6]

Who are the Victims of Human Trafficking?
Victims of human trafficking come from every country, ethnicity, and social class. They become slaves after being kidnapped, intimidated, deceived, enticed, or, simply, born into bondage. People who choose or are forced to move in search of a better economic situation are often those at greatest risk of falling prey to human traffickers. [7] Estimates suggest that 80% of the victims of transnational human trafficking worldwide are female, and half are minors. [8] Often, these women and girls are forced to work in domestic servitude (where many are sexually and physically abused), in the commercial sex industry, or both. While the number of slaves in the US is hard to estimate, it is believed that 17,500 new slaves enter into bondage in the US each year.[9]
In a January 3, 2009 editorial in the New York Times entitled If This Isn't Slavery, What Is?, Nicholas Kristof writes:

Anyone who thinks it is hyperbole to describe sex trafficking as slavery should look at the maimed face of a teenage girl, Long Pross. Glance at Pross from her left, and she looks like a normal, fun-loving girl, with a pretty face and a joyous smile. Then move around, and you see where her brothel owner gouged out her right eye.... Pross was 13 and hadn’t even had her first period when a young woman kidnapped her and sold her to a brothel in Phnom Penh [Cambodia]. The brothel owner...beat Pross and tortured her with electric current until finally the girl acquiesced. She was kept locked deep inside the brothel, her hands tied behind her back at all times except when with customers. Brothel owners can charge large sums for sex with a virgin, and like many girls, Pross was painfully stitched up so she could be resold as a virgin. In all, the brothel owner sold her virginity four times.[10]
In an article from Foreign Policy, Author E. Benjamin Skinner, describes the life of Gonoo Lal Kol, who remains in debt bondage in northern India although Indian laws ban such customs. Skinner writes, "The seed of Gonoo's slavery was a loan of 62 cents. In 1958, his grandfather borrowed that amount from the owner of a farm where he worked. Three generations and three slave masters later, Gonoo's family remains in bondage." Gonoo and his family work fourteen hours a day at a quarry, working off a debt that accrues interest at over 100-percent annually.[11]

John R. Miller, US ambassador at large on modern day slavery from 2004-2006, recounts a conversation he had with a victim of trafficking:
In an Amsterdam hospital I encountered Katya, who recalled how, as a Czech teenager with a disintegrating marriage and a two-year-old daughter, she was told by a “friend of the family” that she could make good money waiting on tables in Amsterdam. A Czech trafficker drove Katya and four other girls to the Netherlands, where he linked up with a Dutch counterpart. After they took the girls’ passports for “safekeeping,” the men drove Katya to a brothel in Amsterdam’s red-light district. When Katya said that she had come to work in a restaurant, she was told that she owed the traffickers thousands of euros for transporting her across Europe. When Katya continued to resist, she was told she must do the men’s bidding if she hoped to see her daughter alive. She was freed only after several years, through the efforts of a friendly taxi driver who enlisted a gang to intimidate her captors.[12]
Effects on the Victims and Countries
In addition to being deprived of their freedoms and basic human rights, trafficking victims' sense of self and worth are destroyed.[13] Victims are often raped, beaten, and dehumanized. Exploiters often instill in victims a mistrust of law enforcement and social services officers.[14] Those who have been abused sexually or who are forced into prostitution are at high risk of becoming infected with sexually transmitted diseases like HIV/AIDS.[15] Victims can even be so traumatized that they become dependent on those who exploit them. As former ambassador Miller writes: ...
Susan, an African-American woman in her twenties...had been terrorized since her teens by her Minneapolis pimp. He exerted such control over her that she didn’t know how to buy groceries, take a bus, or interact with people outside “the business.”[16]
In these cases, as Taina Bien-Aimee, the executive director for Equality Now, says, "No locks, chains or guns are needed to maintain a psychologically broken and abused victim in a state of servitude."[17] When seeking rescue or release from their bondage, victims often face criminal charges and deportation, which can lead to additional charges in their home countries.[18] Also, when victims' families and loved ones threatened with retaliation, there is little reason for victims to cooperate with law enforcement officials.[19]

Recent data shows that countries that have a high prevalence of people trafficked into commercial sex also have a high prevalence rate of HIV/AIDS.[20] In addition to straining health systems, human trafficking can also undermine the safety and security of nations by making use of corrupt officials and making borders porous.

The State Department's Trafficking in Persons Report, 2008

In its 2008 Trafficking in Persons Report, the State Department evaluates how 180 countries' combat human trafficking. The report notes the extent to which each country is a source or destination country of trafficked people, as well as how each punishes traffickers, protects victims, and prevents trafficking from occurring. Among the countries having the poorest rating are North Korea, where destitute men and women are lured into China and fall into slavery schemes. The report also typifies Saudi Arabia as a destination country for men and women trafficked for the purposes of involuntary servitude and commercial sexual exploitation.[21] The full report can be found at: http://www.state.gov/g/tip/rls/tiprpt/2008/.

United States Legislation

The State Department recognizes the US as a destination country for sexual and labor exploitation, and notes that an unknown number of people are trafficked domestically.[22] In 2000, the US introduced the Trafficking in Persons Prevention Act (TVPA); however, there has been no decline in trafficking in the US since the TVPA was introduced.[23] In fact, only 70 cases, out of more than a thousand, were successfully prosecuted between 2000 and 2006.[24] Human Trafficking advocate Jessica Neuwirth states that the "force, fraud, or coercion" requirement in the TVPA is very difficult to prove, and, therefore, can only be used in the most severe cases. She writes, "[This] requirement poses a significant burden on victims, who are often reluctant to testify for a number of reasons, including fear or mistrust of law enforcement, threats by traffickers to harm them or traumatic bonding with their captors."[25]

Due to the TVPA's shortcomings, a new bill, the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA), made its way through Congress and the Senate in 2008. However, many experts agree that the TVPRA will neither greatly increase the number of prosecutions nor adequately protect victims because the "force, fraud, and coercion" stipulation has remained. Ken Franzblau, the director of the anti-trafficking initiative at Equality Now, says, "Even though the TVPRA makes things a little easier, it won't solve the problem to have ten or twelve more prosecutions a year."[26]

Now compare that with what Gafni and Hamilton (mostly Gafni, in my opinion) pass off as their own text at both Integral Life and at Gafni's personal site (and iEvolve?) - this one is from Integral Life:
An Integral Action Proposal in Response to the Horrific Human Rights Violation of World Wide Slavery

Contributors: Marc Gafni and Diane Musho Hamilton Sensei
Overview of the Problem
There are more slaves in the world today than at any other time in history. While precise numbers are hard to ascertain, the International Labor Organization estimates that at least 12.3 million people worldwide—the population of the state of Pennsylvania—are victims of human trafficking. These modern day slaves are exploited in many ways, including the commercial sex industry, as forced laborers and servants, or as child soldiers and child sex workers. Estimates suggest that annual profits from human trafficking range between $9 billion and $32 billion.
Victims of Human Trafficking
In Crash, winner of the 2004 Best Picture Oscar, a character steals a truck only to find Asian women chained and locked in the back. An entire season of HBO's award winning drama The Wire revolves around the murder of thirteen eastern European women destined for sexual exploitation in the US. The orphaned main characters of the recent Indian movie Slumdog Millionaire are forced to beg for money while facing beatings, mutilation, and futures of sexual exploitation from their so-called protectors.
Victims of human trafficking come from every country, ethnicity, and social class. They become slaves after being kidnapped, intimidated, deceived, enticed, or, simply, born into bondage. People who choose or are forced to move in search of a better economic situation are often those at greatest risk of falling prey to human traffickers. Estimates suggest that 80% of the victims of transnational human trafficking worldwide are female, and half are minors. Often, these women and girls are forced to work in domestic servitude (where many are sexually and physically abused), in the commercial sex industry, or both. While the number of slaves in the US is hard to estimate, it is believed that 17,500 new slaves enter into bondage in the US each year.
In a January 3, 2009 editorial in the New York Times entitled If This Isn't Slavery, What Is?, Nicholas Kristof writes:
Anyone who thinks it is hyperbole to describe sex trafficking as slavery should look at the maimed face of a teenage girl, Long Pross. Glance at Pross from her left, and she looks like a normal, fun-loving girl, with a pretty face and a joyous smile. Then move around, and you see where her brothel owner gouged out her right eye.... Pross was 13 and hadn't even had her first period when a young woman kidnapped her and sold her to a brothel in Phnom Penh [Cambodia]. The brothel owner...beat Pross and tortured her with electric current until finally the girl acquiesced. She was kept locked deep inside the brothel, her hands tied behind her back at all times except when with customers. Brothel owners can charge large sums for sex with a virgin, and like many girls, Pross was painfully stitched up so she could be resold as a virgin. In all, the brothel owner sold her virginity four times.
In an article from Foreign Policy, Author E. Benjamin Skinner, describes the life of Gonoo Lal Kol, who remains in debt bondage in northern India although Indian laws ban such customs. Skinner writes, "The seed of Gonoo's slavery was a loan of 62 cents. In 1958, his grandfather borrowed that amount from the owner of a farm where he worked. Three generations and three slave masters later, Gonoo's family remains in bondage." Gonoo and his family work fourteen hours a day at a quarry, working off a debt that accrues interest at over 100-percent annually.
John R. Miller, US ambassador at large on modern day slavery from 2004-2006, recounts a conversation he had with a victim of trafficking:
In an Amsterdam hospital I encountered Katya, who recalled how, as a Czech teenager with a disintegrating marriage and a two-year-old daughter, she was told by a "friend of the family" that she could make good money waiting on tables in Amsterdam. A Czech trafficker drove Katya and four other girls to the Netherlands, where he linked up with a Dutch counterpart. After they took the girls' passports for "safekeeping," the men drove Katya to a brothel in Amsterdam's red-light district. When Katya said that she had come to work in a restaurant, she was told that she owed the traffickers thousands of euros for transporting her across Europe. When Katya continued to resist, she was told she must do the men's bidding if she hoped to see her daughter alive. She was freed only after several years, through the efforts of a friendly taxi driver who enlisted a gang to intimidate her captors.
Effects on the Victims and Countries
In addition to being deprived of their freedoms and basic human rights, trafficking victims' sense of self and worth are destroyed. Victims are often raped, beaten, and dehumanized. Exploiters often instill in victims a mistrust of law enforcement and social services officers. Those who have been abused sexually or who are forced into prostitution are at high risk of becoming infected with sexually transmitted diseases like HIV/AIDS. Victims can even be so traumatized that they become dependent on those who exploit them. As former ambassador Miller writes:
...Susan, an African-American woman in her twenties...had been terrorized since her teens by her Minneapolis pimp. He exerted such control over her that she didn't know how to buy groceries, take a bus, or interact with people outside "the business."
In these cases, as Taina Bien-Aimee, the executive director for Equality Now, says, "No locks, chains or guns are needed to maintain a psychologically broken and abused victim in a state of servitude." When seeking rescue or release from their bondage, victims often face criminal charges and deportation, which can lead to additional charges in their home countries. Also, when victims' families and loved ones threatened with retaliation, there is little reason for victims to cooperate with law enforcement officials.
Recent data shows that countries that have a high prevalence of people trafficked into commercial sex also have a high prevalence rate of HIV/AIDS. In addition to straining health systems, human trafficking can also undermine the safety and security of nations by making use of corrupt officials and making borders porous.
The State Department's Trafficking in Persons Report, 2008
In its 2008 Trafficking in Persons Report, the State Department evaluates how 180 countries' combat human trafficking. The report notes the extent to which each country is a source or destination country of trafficked people, as well as how each punishes traffickers, protects victims, and prevents trafficking from occurring. Among the countries having the poorest rating are North Korea, where destitute men and women are lured into China and fall into slavery schemes. The report also typifies Saudi Arabia as a destination country for men and women trafficked for the purposes of involuntary servitude and commercial sexual exploitation. The full report can be found at: http://www.state.gov/g/tip/rls/tiprpt/2008/.
United States Legislation
The State Department recognizes the US as a destination country for sexual and labor exploitation, and notes that an unknown number of people are trafficked domestically. In 2000, the US introduced the Trafficking in Persons Prevention Act (TVPA); however, there has been no decline in trafficking in the US since the TVPA was introduced. In fact, only 70 cases, out of more than a thousand, were successfully prosecuted between 2000 and 2006.
[There is a whole section of material here that did not come from the Barstow article, but it seems to have come from, perhaps, a government report. He does credit the US Govt's Trafficking in Person's Report 2008, so that would seem to be the source.]
Due to the TVPA's shortcomings, a new bill, the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA), made its way through Congress and the Senate in 2008. However, many experts agree that the TVPRA will neither greatly increase the number of prosecutions nor adequately address protect victims because the "force, fraud, and coercion" stipulation has remained. Ken Franzblau, the director of the anti-trafficking initiative at Equality Now, says, "Even though the TVPRA makes things a little easier, it won't solve the problem to have ten or twelve more prosecutions a year."
This where Barstow's article ends, but Gafni/Hamilton's continues. If he/they lifted that material without attribution, one wonders about the rest of the article and from where it came.

Rocky was upset that I took this down on Diane's word - he had actually spoken to her - as well as Marc, who has nothing nice to say about me, it seems.


10 comments:

Anonymous said...

[reposting original comments]

Rocky Anderson has left a new comment ....

I am the Executive Director of High Road for Human Rights. I can assure anyone that the piece in question was first submitted to me by Alan Barstow and that I provided it to Marc Gafni, who was going to work on it primarily to research and draft a "solutions" section. Anyone who had any question about this could have notified me (I'm easy to locate) to confirm the source of the piece. It is reckless to even raise any question about whether Alan Barstow drafted the document. Also, it is very easy to determine who is on the Board of High Road for Human Rights. www.highroadforhumanrights.org. Marc Gafni, who served for a short period of time, is no longer on the High Road board.

Anonymous said...

[reposting original comments]

Diane Musho has left a new comment on your post .....

Diane Hamilton here. Alan is absolutely correct, and you are right to point this out. Big sections of what we put together for High Road do belong to him. We worked on this together, and I dropped the ball in finishing it and in working Alan and High Road to bring the project to completion. I passed it on to give information about the issue, and wasn't at all relating to the authorship issues. My sincerest apologies.I will rectify it with Alan, and with iLife ASAP. Pure sloppiness on my part.

My sincerest regrets, Diane

WH said...

Sorry Rocky - I didn't want to presume guilt either way without evidence - my sense was that Alan was the author - Diane has confirmed that it was her error.

The link I used: http://www.highroadforhumanrights.org/board/board.htm

Shows Gafni on the board. My apologies if that is no longer the case.

Peace.

****

Thank you for clearing that up, Diane.

[I took out my "deep bow of respect"]

Anonymous said...

[This comment was left at another post at this blog]

Rocky Anderson has left a new comment on your post "Why Is Marc Gafni Featured in 3 Sessions at the 20...":

I have tried to make a comment on the Integral Life web site, but apparently one must become a paid member in order to even leave a comment. (Very curious!) So I will make the comment here and hope that it comes to the attention of whoever is responsible for the Integral Life web site.

On that site is a piece about slavery that Marc Gafni claims to have authored. The title is "An Integral Action Proposal in Response to the Horrific Human Rights Violation of World Wide Slavery." Under that title is the following statement by Marc Gafni: "The following is an initial draft of a proposal on human trafficking which I wrote together with my teaching partner at iEvolve, Diane Musho Hamilton." In fact, most of the piece was written by Alan Barstow. It has been copied almost word-for-word in the piece posted by Mr. Gafni on the Integral Life web site. Mr. Gafni gave no credit to Mr. Barstow for what Mr. Barstow wrote. In fact, there is no reference whatsoever to Mr. Barstow on the Integral Life web site. Neither Mr. Barstow nor High Road for Human Rights has granted permission for the publication of the piece.

I received Mr. Barstow's piece many months ago and forwarded it to Mr. Gafni. Mr. Gafni, who was then on the High Road for Human Rights Board of Directors, was going to prepare a "solutions" section and provide it to me so the entire piece could be posted on High Road's web site (www.highroadforhumanrights.org). After receiving Mr. Gafni's initial draft, I sent to him a couple of questions I felt needed to be addressed in the solutions section before we posted it. Even those questions are contained in the piece posted by Mr. Gafni on the Integral Life web site. ("Of whom are we demanding each item? Also there needs to be specificity for each 'demand.' When, how much, who, where?") Those questions are found in Mr. Gafni's post after the third "Source" at the end of the piece. (Those sources are almost all from Mr. Barstow's work as well.)

Mr. Barstow spent a great deal of time researching and writing his piece. I know because I had numerous conversations with him, and corresponded at some length with him, about what we were seeking to have included in the piece. I provided Mr. Barstow's final work product to Mr. Gafni solely for the purpose of Mr. Gafni researching and writing a section about the steps toward solutions regarding slavery for use on High Road's web site. I did not receive a final draft from Mr. Gafni, who informed me that he did not have time to complete the project.

Since then, we at High Road have worked on a solutions section for several months and have posted it, along with Mr. Barstow's excellent contribution about the nature and scope of worldwide slavery, on the High Road web site.

Mr. Barstow and I had no knowledge of the use of Mr. Barstow's piece on the Integral Life web site until it was recently brought to my attention by a High Road supporter.

This is a very unfortunate matter. I am writing this only to make clear Mr. Barstow's authorship of his outstanding paper on slavery.

Rocky Anderson
Executive Director, High Road for Human Rights

Natalie Lamb said...

I'd read it with someone else. He used a woman's words without acknowledging her.

After I read about Marc's plagiarising I wrote a very naff paper for my final paper for the class he and Diane were teaching - and withheld my personal thoughts/theory that I had written on the paper - as I didn't want in time him to use my thoughts as his own. So I got a rather crap result for that paper - but I wasn't willing to get caught into something like this.

Jake said...

I wonder if Rocky Anderson still stands by his letter posted on Marc Gafni's website (http://www.marcgafni.com/?page_id=438-). In it he defends Gafni by viciously attacking the women who spoke out against his abuse of power:

"Rabbi Marc Gafni has been a victim of a seemingly spiraling abandonment of responsibility. After emails from women with whom he had relationships were deleted from his computer, pathetic charges were made by the women that make it appear they were helpless, obtuse, easily fooled victims of a man who took advantage of them. Then, after the emails were recovered from Gafni’s computer hard-drive, it appears clearly the relationships with the women actually had been the product of mutual consent and honest, loving disclosure of Marc’s intentions. “Gee, I had a sexual relationship with Marc, but things didn’t turn out how I had hoped. I feel hurt, and so I’ll blame him for my part in it and hurt him however I can,” they seem to be saying. Any feminist should be appalled at the pretension of such utter defenselessness, dim-wittedness, and lack of responsibility.

"That isn’t the end of it, however. The claims of these poor, “victimized” souls became known to a woman (Vicky Pollin) who claims to have recovered the most bizarre memories of satanic rituals in which babies were sacrificed, and to a man who is known as a gossip columnist in the pornography industry. They then smeared the claims all over the internet. And they did it in the most salacious, outrageous manner. They’re not required to prove their attacks. They just try and destroy a man’s reputation and much of his life, then move on to the next person."

I have no sympathy for Mr. Anderson, who wrote so cruelly about a situation he knew nothing about, and who was convinced by Gafni to blame and malign the messengers. But he can now join the long line of public figures who at one time defended Gafni's integrity and lived to regret it.

Marc Gafni said...

Dear Bill,

I received an email about your post on Sunday night from Diane. We had read Alan Barstow's work, which was excellent, but I had not included it in my initial draft of the piece we were worked over approximately a year ago. I did not know that Alan Barstow's material was included in the article. I became aware of it when I saw your post. It was my responsibility to know. There was no intention on our part to lift material without attribution.

I would have liked to comment earlier as the mistake was in part my responsibility. I was traveling on Sunday night and Monday. I emailed and phoned with some of the parties while traveing, but it was naturally difficult to do in a sustained fashion. I got in late last night and drafted a clarification and apology from myself in this regard as Diane has already posted an apology. I waited till this morning to receive some third person feedback from the parties involved which I have received. Hence the wait before my response, which I have included below.

A final personal note. I am preparing energetically to become a father again with my partner Mariana. This is where much of my personal energy is these days.

Your posts in the last weeks have contained so much verifiably untrue information - just one example among many being the accusation that I was never at Oxford and fabricated my doctorate. These accusations are so far from truth, and so easily verifiable, that I would not even know where to begin in responding.

Having said that, Bill, if there was ever a genuine interest in a dialogue between us, scheduled in advanced, to have a serious and full conversation, on the record but with no editing on either side -just an honest conversation between men- I will be available for it. It would have to wait until awhile after the baby was born but we could schedule it.

Formal Note from Marc Gafni:

A section of the recent article on human trafficking, which was posted in the Integral space, suffered from an important, unintentional oversight, in that it inadvertently used significant sections of Alan Barstow's article without direct quotation or attribution. The Barstow material was not in first draft of the article. I had read Barstow's excellent article but had not included his material in the initial draft as my focus was different.. The
inclusion of the material happened as a result of passing drafts back and forth between the writers of the piece and then not tracking over time what was being incorporated and where it came from. A second contributing factor was the almost one year of lag-time between the research on the piece and its posting. This resulted in a significant amount of Barstow's material being seamlessly incorporated into the article without direct quotation or attribution. This was completely unintentional and is highly regrettable. Barstow's material was a significant part of the piece and should never have been posted without direct quotation from him.

Deep apologies for the lack of appropriate rigor and review which led to this mistake. The initial intention of the piece was to amass research material on the subject with no intent to post it. There should have been a review process of tracing the sources through the early drafts before any posting, which would have caught this significant mistake. I should have reviewed the article carefully and checked all the material before posting it, which I did not. Intentional plagarism in an internet age is simply silly as it is so easy to check everything and everyone is always watching for these kind of mistakes. There was no ill intention here at all and fully responsibility has been taken for the mistake. The article has been removed from the public space.
Marc Gafni

Jenny B said...

in this post, you use the example of Bill of saying in his blog here that you didnt get a doctorate from Oxford as evidence of his lack of rigour

I cannot find any such assertion from Bill anywhere, i do see that a person mentioned to check this in one of the comments added to bill though,

It seems to be you marc - not checking your facts and distorting evidence not bill ,

also nearly the whole of your slavery post was by Alan Barstow, word for word, this is a lot more than what you are saying
which is you inadvertantly included significant parts to your article

what would help is if you could repost the article highlighting which parts you actually wrote yourself, as there seems to be very little or any

other than that a more appropriate apology, taking better responsiblity would be in order

Jenny said...

What about Rocky's other article that Mark published as his own without mentioning Rocky,where he also claiming sloppiness as the cause? I see it has been taken down now

What about his third wife's claim that he regularly plagarised other people and did

Why does Mark use a fairly regular personal tactic of trying to discredit Bill by saying that Bill published innacurrate information questioning Mark's Oxford doctorate, when in actual fact in was a woman leaving a comment on the site who merely said check if its true as, on the basis of previous lies, it may not be.

Why do I frequently feel insane when i read something by Mark? could it be me? or is he just insane making?

Why doesn't Mark check his facts better? Why does he frequently misrepresent books and authors, which he then claims to be superior to in monologues where you get no chance to point out the error.

There is something not quite right here

John Krizzle said...

I have no sympathy for Mr. Anderson, who wrote so cruelly about a situation he knew nothing about, and who was convinced by Gafni to blame and malign the messengers. But he can now join the long line of public figures who at one time defended Gafni's integrity and lived to regret it.