Tuesday, April 10, 2007

Poem A Day: Henri Cole

Yesterday's poem The Academy of American Poets:

Oil & Steel
by Henri Cole

My father lived in a dirty dish mausoleum,
watching a portable black-and-white television,
reading the Encyclopedia Britannica,
which he preferred to Modern Fiction.
One by one, his schnauzers died of liver disease,
except the one that guarded his corpse
holding a tumbler of Bushmills.
"Dead is dead," he would say, an anti-preacher.
I took a plaid shirt from the bedroom closet
and some motor oil—my inheritance.
Once, I saw him weep in a courtroom—
neglected, needing nursing—this man who never showed
me much affection but gave me a knack
for solitude, which has been mostly useful.


1 comment:

Robert said...

Pinsky seems to have liked this poem as well. I can see why.