Wednesday, September 28, 2011

TEDxFlanders - Molly Crockett - understanding the brain


Another cool TEDx Talk - this one from Flanders. Here is the statement from her page at (University of) Cambridge Neuroscience:
I study the neural basis of human altruism, morality and value-based decision-making. My research investigates the influence of neurotransmitters (serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine) on the brain systems that motivate social and economic behavior. To explore these questions, I conduct experiments using pharmacological manipulations, brain imaging, psychophysiology and behavioral analysis. Understanding the mechanisms behind prosocial behavior can inform the development of social and economic institutions that promote social values over selfishness and discourage antisocial behavior.
Glad to see more research being done on pro-social behavior. And here is the background for this video.
Does your sense of fairness depend on what you ate for breakfast? Can Prozac influence your judgment of what is right or wrong? How can we encourage people to care about the welfare of others? Molly Crockett's research addresses these questions. She believes that understanding the brain can enable us to design environments that promote cooperation instead of selfishness.


Why listen to her?
Molly's research has taken her far from her native Southern California, where she studied psychology as an undergraduate at the University of California, Los Angeles. Molly's curiosity about brain chemistry led her to the University of Cambridge, where she completed her PhD in neuroscience as a Gates Scholar. Now she collaborates with economists at the University of Z├╝rich and neuroscientists at University College London.



Web: mollycrockett.com – Twitter: @mollycrockett

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

The morons who run TEDx have decided to make this video private and unviewable. Brilliant decision. I watched the video 4 days ago. Now, it no longer exists.

Are the people who run the TED talks drunk, brain-damaged, or simply on hard drugs?

What purpose does it serve to block off useful information from the public? How does that help anyone?